Culture

#MeToo Takes Center Stage at Award Shows

By Daniel F.

The #MeToo movement has overtaken this award season. Many people have worn black at the award shows to show respect for the movement. Students agree that #MeToo should be discussed in the awards shows.

“Art is meant to be a representation of society,” said junior Kyle C., “and the movement is disruptive.” He thinks disruption in Hollywood is good because “people are supposed to raise issues in society.”

Sophomore Emma G. agreed and said, “Sometimes it’s hard to get it to the public in any other way then just bring it to the forefront.” Junior Heath M. also agreed and said, “It will show people how bad it is. It will prevent it from occurring [again].”

#MeToo became the forefront of the Golden Globes. Host Seth Meyers started his opening monologue with the line, “Good evening ladies and remaining gentlemen.” He talked and joked about the men who have been accused. “Harvey Weinstein isn’t here tonight. Because, well, I’ve heard rumors that he’s crazy and difficult to work with,” he said. “But don’t worry, he’ll be back in 20 years when he becomes the first person ever booed during the ‘In Memoriam.’”

Other celebrities talked about the movement as well. Natalie Portman took on the Golden Globes for not nominating a female director. When announcing the nominees, she said, “And here are the all male nominees.” Oprah delivered a speech after accepting the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement. “For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up,” she said. Oprah referenced the Time’s Up movement, which has gotten stronger with #MeToo.

However, there has been some criticism of Hollywood. Actress Rose McGowan, the first accuser of Harvey Weinstein and the person who helped ignite the movement, criticized the award show. In a tweet, “And not one of those fancy people wearing black to honor our rapes would have lifted a finger had [#MeToo not started],” McGowan said, “I have no time for Hollywood fakery.” McGowan has since started a documentary series entitled “Citizen Rose. Emma G. said, “I think it was very brave her to go and step up even though no one else had. It’s something important just being able to allow other women to feel comfortable enough to step up and say this has been happening.”

At the Grammys, Kesha performed an empowering version of her song “Praying,” with many other famous women in solidarity with the movement. Also, Greta Gerwig received an Oscar nomination for directing “Lady Bird,” becoming the fifth woman nominated for the award. Christopher Plummer, who replaced Kevin Spacey for Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World,” also received an Oscar nomination. Plummer replaced Spacey after accusations against Spacey alleging sexual assault. In a statement via email, Plummer said, “It was quite unexpected but incredibly gratifying. Everything has happened so quickly of late that I am still a trifled stunned but excited by it all.”

#MeToo is not just confined to Hollywood. It has also targeted the Olympics. Larry Nassar, former doctor for Olympic gymnastics athletes, sexually assaulted hundreds of girls and women when he was working. Among them include Needham native Aly Raisman. Nassar has been sentenced to over 200 years in prison for his actions over more than a decade.

The #MeToo movement gains traction every day as more and more people come out with their stories.

If you have been or know of someone who has been sexually assaulted or harassed, you should tell a trusted adult and seek help.

Video of Oprah’s speech from the Washington Post on YouTube.

Video of Kesha performing “Praying” from keshaVEVO on YouTube.

Feature image from Ddd-www on Creative Commons.

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